Tag Archives: 7 Wastes

Lean & Delayed Passports – Can your Law firm learn from it?

Delayed Passports – Can your Law firm learn from it?

Apologies if any one reading this have been hit by the “recent” (Summer 2014) delays in the processing of passports in the UK.
I’m hoping this post points you to things you and your firm can learn from it and how Lean Management can help your legal business.

Before we go on, let’s consider the current situation at the Passport service (as best as we can tell anyway);

  • They promise that a normal passport will be turned around in 3 weeks. Fast Track Service (1 week turnaround) or 1 day Premium turnaround service, both for at increased costs. They also tell us it takes 4 hours to process a passport from the moment you (the customer) supply all the paperwork, correctly filled in.
  • There is at least of a backlog of between 50,000 and 500,000 passports  – depending whose figures you believe
  • There are now regular stories of delays of 6,8,12 weeks – backed up by a picture of the distraught family members who missed their holiday

????????????????????????

What can we learn from this?

Firstly that the Passport Office is running normally at a process efficiency of 3.33%.

How do we know this? Easily, it takes 3 weeks to complete 4 hours work, they tell us this from their own webpages.

3 weeks is 120 hours (based on a 40 hour week).

4 divided by 120 = 0.333.  0.333*100% = 3.33%

Before you think that is poor, we tend to see less than 1% in organisations yet to try any Lean or Continuous Improvement work.

Secondly the Passport Office has discovered there is a Premium for Speed.

Go faster and you can charge more, not less as many would believe. A Fast Track Service (1 week turnaround) costs 42% more than the normal and the Premium (Same day turnaround) costs 76% more and for these two, YOU, the customer have attend their offices, thereby incurring more of your own time, yet you pay more.

The two questions here for your firms are

  • Do you know the process efficiency of your different legal services? try and work it out (it is simply hours recorded to a matter divided by the hours between the start date and the final invoice date; don’t forget to times by 100% at the end)
  • You might be surprised at how similar the figures are, across the same types of service.
  • Do you know the Premium for Speed you can charge clients? Is there one or will a faster service get you more of the business? so the premium here is being used for business winning.

Note: it probably doesn’t cost the Passport Office that much more to deliver the faster service – how can it? do they do better/different checks, use smarter people, faster computers, different paper?

Why has there been a backlog?
The cause appears to either be

A larger than normal application level for passports AND/OR a processing team with too few numbers to cope with the level of demand.

These might seem the same but how they manifest themselves and are dealt with can be different.

Take the rise in demand first;

Did it suddenly happen? in one day all these extra applications dropped onto the doormat of the passport office. I’d like to think that it took a little longer, maybe 2-3 weeks or even 6-8 weeks during which time every day the number of applications tended to be above what was normally expected. (in fact we are told it was an “unprecedented” demand)

Lets say it started to build at the middle of April and by the end of May the performance was considerably off target.

If they had been tracking daily, the new applications and completions they may have spotted the backlog rising much quicker and dealt with it sooner.

We can assume that the Passport Office either don’t record or don’t act upon information about the number of new applications they receive daily. (my betting? it’s the latter, data is nearly always recorded, rarely converted to true information AND used)

My questions are

  • how often do you track new and completed activity?
  • At the end of the month, in a quarterly review?
  • Do you review operational figures such as demand, completion or do financial figures take centre stage? noting that they are only ever a function of activity levels
  • or do you review new activity and completed activity daily/weekly?

In the case of the Passport Office I believe they could have done it even sooner e.g. by tracking web stats, how many visits to website where there each day? did that show an upturn even before the increased numbers of applications came through? probably.

What about the printed forms in the Post Offices, why have they not run out of them? Did they see a rise in demand?

These early, lead, indicators often exist but are ignored – Does your firm have any early, lead indicators it looks too?

The next area to tackle is this; even if they had been tracking new applications and spotted the increase they seemed not to know how many applications they could cope with in a set period.

The Passport Office seems to proves that if you have a set capacity e.g. number of staff, number of PCs, working a set number of hours – if you ask them to do more items of the same type, then queues will rise.

Do you know what the capacity is for work in your business and how queues arise? This could be for a particular type of legal file or back office support such as the disbursement processing or invoice production.

If you don’t know what work you have on the books or how long it will take to complete it, you could end up in similar state of affairs.

The only difference here is the Passport Office are paid up front for delivery, therefore there is a limited effect on cash flow.

If the work of a law firm takes longer, then WIP rises and the date payment is received gets pushed out and they need more cash on hand to survive.

The power of 1!
In spite of this backlog, in a normal year there is a chance that something will go wrong with passport processing and it will fail, no system is ever 100% when it comes to performance.

Now we hear and read stories of “local hero” MPs intervening and sorting out the issues – they haven’t. They’ve just caused another passport application to be pushed further back, whilst their constituents is expedited.

They are the equivalent of the client ringing up to demand you process their matter just as you have finished reading through another matter, ready to start that.

Instead of producing figures of how many passports have been processed in the correct time and the % success rate, the Passport Office appear to have been hung out to dry by the media ready to produce the sorrowful family, who played by the rules but have now missed out on that once in a lifetime trip.

Does this happen in your firm? one thing goes wrong, one person shouts up and all of a sudden a one time event becomes a large problem and the performance as demonstrated by the problem becomes the accepted reality.

Instead of looking at all the times something goes right we focus on the one time it fails. Things will always fail, what we need to know is the rate of failure an issue or just one of those events we can’t control.

The media and people love the Power of 1, the one event, the one time, the one person who bucked the system or for whom the system failed.

What are you trying to fix? Who are you focussing your resources on? the Power of 1? or on the things you are trying to get right every day in your organisation?

Lean Thinking has a host of Daily Management and Visual Management tools & techniques that can help you avoid the issues above, they are for another post though.
If you want to find out more about Lean management and Improvement in Law Firms then you can by clicking on this Lean Guide for Legal Practices & Departments you’ll be taken to our page which has a number of free articles and a guide on how to start a conversation in your business about finding the hidden wastes in your legal practice or department.

About the Author

Mark Greenhouse has been working on the application of Lean management and process improvement in Legal and design led Manufacturing companies for the past 5 years. His own Lean journey started back in 1988 when he started study of Production Engineering and Operations Management. He’s applied lean in many organisation types, finance, call centres, banking, FMCG etc. Mark also provides lectures on operational management at Leeds University Business School.

 

Re-engineering the Business of Law

  • How can I apply resources more effectively?
  • How can I shorten cycle time?
  • How can I lower the cost of the service?
  • Whilst raising the customer service?

J.Stephen Poor, chairman of Seyfarth Shaw, in his article for The New York Times, financial news service DealB%k, offers that lawyers today should be asking these non-traditional questions to meet the changing demands of the buyers of legal services.

What experience do Seyfarth have in this? well if you’d like to read Continuous Improvement in a Law Firm , you’ll get an idea of the results they achieved through their SeyfarthLean program, within the practice.

Secondly, Seyfarth, now advise General Counsel in adopting these techniques read about it in Lean Consulting from a Legal Firm ?…

Stephen goes on in the article Re-Engineering the Business of Law, from DealB%k, to share three core lessons from the, Seyfarth, experience of change;

1. Be Prepared to Examine and Reimagine the Business Model

He talks of the use of Lean Six Sigma borrowed from the Lean Manufacturing sector, in his law firm. He mentions that this has resulted in various tools, analyses and process improvement techniques intended to drive efficiency into the delivery of legal services – at ALL levels of the business.

Free Continuous Improvement Guide for Legal Firms – is our free insights paper in which we examine the 7 Frustrations found in many law firms and departments.  Frustrations that lead reduce efficiency, hold back service delivery and increase costs.

If you have these frustrations then they will be wasting your time and effort.

The guide shows you what we look for and explores in more detail what improvement means for law firms.

We would add that if you have competitors doing things different, faster, cheaper than your organisation ask yourself

“What does the Customer see?” if they see the same service, the same output, how are you going to match it?

*We often use the word customer to replace client in our terminology.

If potential customers see both you and your competitor outputs as being the same, adding the same value; it might just be time to ask “How are they doing it, quicker, faster, cheaper?”

2. Don’t Settle for Half Steps

Process improvement is only part of the solution, it is never the complete answer. Seyfarth realised that trying to drive different behaviours would require them to address issues, such as associate evaluation and to re-examine their staffing models.

If you change how you do business it’s not unreasonable to realise you may need different metrics to measure it and different levels and numbers of skills within that business.

Stephen notes that “The point is not that our path is for everyone. The point is that the willingness to change and adapt business models must anticipate and address the variables that drive organisational success.”

He also makes the connection that “Marketing efforts are lovely; certainly, we all do marketing. But if one is to truly evolve a business model, the only way to avoid having it become simply a marketing effort is to recognise that it must drive through all parts of the organisation.” This is something that often change processes have failed to grasp, regardless of industry.

If you want to see our 2 page paper Legal Process Improvement v Marketing to see which has the greater effect on business performance then drop us a line , mark@levantar.co.uk or call Mark Greenhouse on 01904 277007.

3. Never Underestimate Resistance to Change.

“Never underestimate the resistance to change from lawyers”

Our experience tells us that every sector has its fair share of change resistors because you are dealing with people. Nonetheless these people have reasons and beliefs for not changing; our challenge and yours is to enable them to see what change is and why it is required and how they can contribute and shape it.

Stephen shares that they did “not anticipate the resistance from other crucial stakeholders – especially clients. Much of what we’ve done is most effective when deployed in a collaborative change process with clients.” This is based on the key learning that most of their clients are lawyers too, involving them in building the business case was critical.

If we can offer a tip here.

Many of your clients are working in organisations that have departments and personnel looking into improvement, many use lean or process improvement techniques. These people may not have made their way into the legal departments of your clients, why not invite them in?

His final notes could be applied to any sector;

“The nature of the process requires a continuous, but slow march toward improvement and adaptation. Some things we tried worked and some did not. Nevertheless, the continuous move forward takes persistence and, perhaps, a bit of stubbornness.”

Levantar have been promoting the use of Lean management tools in Law Firms, in the UK. contact Mark Greenhouse on 01904 277007 for more details.

Click on Lean Legal Process Improvement to find out more about the services offered.

About the Author

Mark Greenhouse has been working on the application of Lean management in Legal and design led Manufacturing companies for the past 5 years. His own Lean journey started back in 1988 when he started study of Operations Management . He’s applied lean in many organisation types, finance, call centres, banking, FMCG etc. Mark also provides lectures on operational management at Leeds University Business School.


How much waste is there in the Service Industry?

Over the weekend a question was posed to me via Twitter (@theleanmanager if you’d like to follow) about the amount of waste (wasted time) in the back office of banks/service/insurance operations. Now I took this to mean the call centres, data processing centres, mail rooms, customer response teams etc.

The guys asking the questions @wisemonkeyash and @channingwalton  wanted to know could it be as high as 90%? (Update: we do know that in some legal firms the time to process matters is being improved by 50%, by using lean thinking, indicating that wasted time could considerable in the professional services sector.)

I decided I should expand upon my 140 character replies, which were based on my experience.

Variation of demand is the first factor to consider i.e. what does the busiest day (for demand, not completed work) look like and what does a quiet day look like and what are the patterns the peaks and troughs for the demand.

What causes this demand, the peaks and troughs? Our experience? it’s normally another part of the business which generates and stokes the demand and therefore changes here can reduce the peaks.

This could be letters with incorrect details, mass direct marketing mailing, customers chasing progress etc

This variation often causes capacity (people) to be 50% more than required to achieve the current results.

The implications here are that you can deliver improvement by changing something outside of the back offices, without changing what many individuals do – making continuous improvement more readily accepted.

Remember that so far we haven’t looked at the waste in the activities undertaken in these departments. Now as a lean person we look for the 7 hidden wastes, yes I know others have 8 or even 9 but we stick to the 7.

To give you just one example, have you rung a call centre, in the last 6 months,  to be told ” I’m sorry the system is a bit slow today”?

Sometimes that is genuine, the system is slow, it may be that the networking is slow or the server needs upgrading or the PC workstation is old. So say you have 50 agents handling 20 calls an hour? how much time are you wasting because the technology isn’t up to speed?

The more common reason for ” I’m sorry the system is a bit slow today”, that we see is that staff have two screens in front of them and they maybe running 4 different programmes at once. As the programmes can’t transfer information directly to one another, the staff take info from one system, send to their own e-mail, cut and paste it into another programme and then have to delete the e-mail.

This is just one example and adding up the rest we often find that 50% of the activity time is wasted.

What does this mean  overall?

If we start with 100% and 50% is waste due to Variation demand, this leaves 50%.

Of the remaining 50%, we reckon 50% is wasted time, so we get to the figure of 25% (50% *50%), or 75% of the work can be classified as waste.

Remember this is based on what we have seen, so not as high as the 90% the guys originally asked.

Within an hour I spotted this article all Aviva shakes up it’s Customer Service  from the FT, which shows the global serving UK based insurance firm Aviva put the waste figure in call centres as 60%.

It’s also worth noting that Aviva thought it was completing work in 5 days, in reality it was taking 39.

How can this happen? well sometime companies split activities into discrete chunks and add up the time each chunk takes, assuming this equals the processing time. They forget the handoffs and delays that each happen between each activity. We’ve definitely seen office work with activities of an hour take over 10 days to complete in reality.

Okay there is a variation in the figures but should we split hairs on whether waste in offices is 50% as in the professional services firms or 60% – 75% for the back offices and call centres, the reality is that the waste appears to be relatively large, though maybe not as large as the 90% that started the question.

Do you have any views on what the waste could be?

About the Author;

Mark Greenhouse has been working on the application of Lean management in Legal and design led Manufacturing companies for the past 5 years. His own Lean journey started back in 1988 when he started study of Production Engineering. He’s applied lean in many organisation types, finance, call centres, banking, FMCG etc. Mark also provides lectures on operational management at Leeds University Business School.

Getting the Order out

In the last year UK Manufacturing grew productivity by 5.7% (source EEF),this means that many manufacturing companies will be

  1. better at getting products and orders out on time – that end of day or Friday afternoon last minute chasing of jobs is reduced,
  2. increasing the margins and profitability of their business,
  3. improving the quality of what they send out,
  4. starting to sleep better at night knowing that they can pay bills when they come due. 

So just a couple of thoughts?

  • Have your team (managers and staff) delivered similar improvements? more products and orders out on time, increased profits, better quality,  and confidence that the business current account can pay the bills!
  • Are you getting better returns, every year, from the same levels of investment in people, machinery, raw materials?

If not, how could that be? remember 5.7% is an average, so some companies will have gained much more than this and the cash that goes along with it*

If you haven’t had such gains,

  • Do you and your teams have the time to look for productivity improvements or does the day to day get in the way?
  • Do you think your teams know where to look for productivity improvements?
  • Are they too close to the work to give you an objective assessment of what could be improved?
  • Would you like to get to the answers (& the cash, the improved performance it brings) quickly?

If you’re a manufacturing business owner or a manager who’d like to find out whether you could be getting better returns for your investment and improve your productivity there is a FREE scheme that can help you find out.

A FREE scheme? well it’s the Manufacturing Advisory Service which is one of the few business schemes which has survived the Government cuts.

What do you get for FREE then? you get to meet with an experienced manufacturing professional, normally at your own premises, so no travel involved, who will

  • listen to what you want to achieve, what you need to achieve to keep customers onside
  • understand the challenges you face (cash flow, quality, skills, etc)
  • appreciate how the experience, expertise and skills you already have can be built upon

from that they will be able to decide whether they can help and IF they can they will provide the names of accredited companies, with the relevant skills in Lean Manufacturing, ISO 9001, ERP, Product Design etc who can help you to improve your productivity.

Nearly forgot to mention the £6,000 FREE investment for productivity work. If you decide to invest in productivity projects, with an accredited supplier, then you could get up to £6,000 towards the costs.

Lots of paperwork? hoops to jump through? not normally, your advisors can help you with the small amount of paperwork to be filled in.

Do you qualify? Do you employ less than 250 employees? have a turnover less than 50M euros? see most companies will qualify.

ResQ currently complete work for MAS in Lean Manufacturing across Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire, Derbyshire, Humberside, Yorkshire ( East, West, North and South ).

If you’re in these areas and you’d like to know more about MAS then give us a call (01904 277 007 or 0115 711 7007) and we can see if we can help.

Outside of the areas above then go to the MAS website and give them a call.

Two companies that achieved much more than 5.7% are detailed below.

Case Study 1 – Lean Manufacturing FMCG, Warehousing & Distribution Company gains 14% Productivity increase.

Case Study 2 – Lean Manufacturing Printing Company gains 40% more capacity.

* the two companies in the case studies above gained 14% & 40% improvement by using Lean Manufacturing and Thinking techniques, we completed the work for them via the MAS scheme. 

This time next year you could be confident that customer orders are being

  • delivered on time,
  • delivering increasing profits,
  • safe in the knowledge that your business can pay its own way!

Oh and you may find you’ll be making 5%,10%,15% even 40% more this time next year!

Venetian Warships, Faster Horses and Legal Firms.

When a US law firm wanted to find a way of becoming more efficient and deliver legal matters more effectively they turned to a set of techniques that have their roots back when the Venetians built ships at the Arsenale, techniques continued by Henry Ford, once he’d noticed his clients wanted faster horses.

Today that law firm is lauded as being “5 years ahead of every other AmLaw 200  firm” and now claims to deliver legal matters some 15 -50% faster than before. Not surprisingly this has driven down costs, driven up satisfaction and helped to secure new customers.

On the 6th April 2011 Mark Greenhouse of ResQ will be presenting to the Yorkshire Law Society on the techniques that can be used to improve the speed of delivery whilst reducing costs and how this will affect firm profitability and pave the way for true Fixed and Alternative billing to take place.

For details visit Yorkshire Law Society Continuous Improvement in Law.

If you’re not in Yorkshire and would like to find out more then drop us your contact details on info@resqmr.co.uk  and we’ll get back to you.

Thanks,  Mark

Free Lean Management Training Course

From time to time, we offer free training via other organisations.  One such organisation we work with is Leeds, York & North Yorkshire Chamber of Commerce.

On the 25th March 2011, in Leeds, we’re offering a free 2 hour insight into Lean Management techniques. This is about how Lean can be applied across all departments in any organisation, so it isn’t limited to just manufacturing or profit facing bsuinesses.

So

  • if you work in IT, Finance, NHS, Public Sector, Service, Marketing or Manufacturing companies or
  • if your career means you are responsible for continuous improvement, process improvement, or training or
  • if you are faced with getting more out with the same or fewer resources

then this course will give you something to take away to use in improvement.

You can find all the details here LEAN MANAGEMENT TRAINING  COURSE

This session will show you how you can improve your business efficiency, by using tools and techniques developed in manufacturing and now proven within organisations, ranging from Tesco, Toyota, Zara, GE, NHS, Intel, Johnson & Johnson, Seyfarth Shaw (Law firm) through to Starbucks.

Lean manufacturing businesses found that more than 70% of their improvement projects lay not on the shop floor but in the offices and service based departments and so it has spread to these sectors. It will help to improve your business speed, capacity, cost control and quality whatever your sector or department.

If you’ve got any questions on this training then drop us a line.

Thanks

ResQ

Where is the Value?

In recent months I’ve met several managers, running departments (operations, marketing, HR, IT), all working for different companies (Sectors include: retail, banking, manufacturing, IT) who at some point have all said a very similar thing;

“one of my problems is, my department isn’t seen as adding value, we’re seen as a cost centre”

So my questions are

  • where is the value created in organisations these days?
  • does it matter that the departments believe they are seen as cost centres?
  • If you subsitute the word profit for value does this help?
  • Should it matter that we understand where value is created? is knowing costs enough?

Any views or examples (positive or negative) on this greatly appreciated in the comments below.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to Ma.gnoliaAdd to TechnoratiAdd to FurlAdd to Newsvine